Burkholderia cepacia

Structure and Physiology

This bacteria is Gram-negative, rod shaped, and capable of growth in a variety of environments including soil, water, animals, and plants. B. cepacia is closely related to Pseudomonas spp. and exhibits several similar morphological characteristics.

Transmission and Disease

Typically identified as a plant and human pathogen, it is known to cause onion bulb rot and is a prevalent cause of infection in individuals with cystic fibrosis.

Propionibacterium acnes

Structure and Physiology

This bacteria is a Gram-positive, rod shaped, aerotolerant anaerobe. Slow growing and aerotolerant, this microorganism is part of the normal flora of healthy human skin, living deep inside pores and follicles. 

Mycobacterium smegmatis

Structure and Physiology

This bacteria is an acid-fast, bacillus-shaped, aerobic microorganism that is commonly used a surrogate model for M. tuberculosis and is found in soil, plants, and water.

Transmission and Disease

M. smegmatis is non-pathogenic to humans except in rare cases, and is considered saprophytic. Unlike other pathogenic Mycobacterium, M. smegmatis isn't dependent on living in animals.

Mycobacterium bovis BCG

Structure and Physiology

This bacterium is a rod shaped, slow growing, aerobic bacterium. As this microbe is acid-fast, staining is done using the Ziehl-Neelson stain rather than gram staining. 

Streptococcus sobrinus

Structure and Physiology

This bacteria is a Gram-positive, sphere-shaped, anaerobic microorganism that is pathogenic within humans.

Transmission and Disease

Found in the human mouth in the form of biofilm and plaque, S. sobrinus thrives in the slightly acidic environment of the oral cavity because it metabolizes food sugars passing through the mouth. The high consumption of these sugars may facilitate the growth of these organisms and because of this, may be one of the of the onsets of early childhood tooth decay.

Neiserria gonorrhoeae

Structure and Physiology

This bacteria is a Gram-negative diplococci.

Transmission and Disease

Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the causative agent of the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea. This bacteria is capable of transformation and conjugation to spread genes and mutations. This makes it difficult for the immune system to recognize and an area of interest in medical research due to rising antibiotic resistance.

Bordetella pertussis

Structure and Physiology

This bacterium is a Gram-negative, non-motile, coccobacillus aerobe.

Micrococcus luteus

Structure and Physiology

This bacteria is Gram-positive, spherical, and an obligate aerobe. M. luteus is part of the normal flora of the human skin.

Transmission and Disease

M. luteus is rarely found to be responsible for infections. Only those with compromised immune systems are thought to be susceptible to an infection.

Serratia marcescens

Structure and Physiology

This bacteria is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped, facultative anaerobe that has been classified as an opportunistic pathogen for immunocompromised individuals. This bacteria can be commonly found in damp environments like bathrooms, where it manifests as a pink-orange film due to a reddish-orange pigment called prodigiosin.

Transmission and Disease

S. marcescens can be responsible for infections at several sites on the human body including the eyes, urinary tract, and respiratory system.

Streptococcus pneumoniae

Structure and Physiology

This bacteria is Gram-positive, aerotolerant, and spherical-shaped. S. pneumonia is part of the normally occurring flora of the upper respiratory tract.

Transmission and Disease

S. pneumoniae can be responsible for numerous infections including pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis.

Disinfection

S. pneumoniae has exhibited susceptibility to several antimicrobial products and is moderately easy to disinfect.

Notes

References

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